IGRS Editor

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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  • in reply to: Will Calendars reference numbers #12784
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    Hi Ruth, The term Will Registers is something new. They’ve always been known as Will Books until some bright spark at NAI decided otherwise within the past couple of years!!

    in reply to: Will Calendars reference numbers #12782
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster
    in reply to: Will Calendars reference numbers #12781
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    I would assume that they refer to page entries in the Will or Admon Registers maintained by each Probate Registry. These books up o 1900 are scanned on the NAI website (though finding them is a nightmare!). However, I crossed referenced a few such entries and the numbers noted in the printed will calendars don’t correspond to the Will Books. They could possibly be page numbers corresponding to the Grant Books.

    in reply to: Will Calendars reference numbers #12779
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    I would assume that they refer to page entries in the Will or Admon Registers maintained by each Probate Registry. These books up o 1900 are scanned on the NAI website (though finding them is a nightmare!). However, I crossed referenced a few such entries and the numbers noted in the printed will calendars don’t correspond to the Will Books. They could possibly be page numbers corresponding to the Grant Books.

    in reply to: Will Calendars reference numbers #12772
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    Hi Ruth, What period of the Calendars are you referring to? Can you post a link to an example? Cheers, Steven

    in reply to: Smith Folk in Co. Cavan #12325
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    Great suggestions, thanks Bob. I’ll keep you posted.  🙂

    in reply to: 1799 Census Carrick-on-Suir #12135
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    Its found under resources:

    Census of Carrick-on-Suir, 1799

    in reply to: 1941 Register #12117
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    The Population Registers were the equivalent to the UK’s National Register; but unlike the UK, several were compiled during The Emergency (as the war was referred to in Ireland). This appears to have been because the Population Register was not updated, but static. Thus changes of address and births and deaths necessitated the collection of up-to-date data.

    The first were compiled in 1941 and then subsequent canvasses were taken in 1943, 1947 and possibly 1951. The data noted was each person’s name, occupation and date of birth. The data was collated by address on the night of the canvas. However, unlike the UK, where an individual was away from home on the set night their permanent address was recorded too.

    Despite making extensive enquiries I have been unable so far to establish the fate of the Population Registrars and it seems likely that they have been destroyed. Assumedly, each earlier register was pulped after the subsequent one was compiled.

    Although they were not census enumerations, the system followed for gathering the data was borrowed from the census. All personal data was noted on ‘Form As’, which were household schedules, and statistics and lists of the household returns (noting each head of household’s name) were recorded by street or townland on ‘Form Bs’.

    Enquiries have established that the Central Statistics Office retains some – possibly all – of the statistical ‘Form Bs’ but not the vital ‘Form As’.

    i hope this helps.

    in reply to: Records of the King’s Bench in Ireland? #10103
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    As there was little enough difference in the jurisdiction of the Irish court of Kings Bench it would be worth your while reading this wiki article on the Kings Bench in England: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Court_of_King%27s_Bench_(England)#Jurisdiction

    In Ireland, among the four superior courts, it was mainly “big” criminal cases that were heard by the Kings Bench. Though much ordinary, but nonetheless serious, day-to-day crime was dealt with by the Assize courts, the next down, the Quarter Sessions and below them, the Petty Sessions. But the Kings Bench wasn’t exclusively hearing criminal cases, it could hear cases too where citizens sued one another, but where there appeared to be some aspect (sometimes fictional) that involved the King (or Queen, when the monarch was female).

    Hope this helps. Bob Frewen is right that the best place for details about court cases is often the press, even where original material survives.

    in reply to: French probate records #10173
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster
    in reply to: Discussion of editorial on Civil Registers #9570
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    It’s about time too!

    Just goes to show the influence and reach that a Society like the IGRS can have in the world of Irish genealogy.

    Here is a link to the piece on the WDYTYA? magazine’s website, fourth item down: http://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/news/genealogy-news-roundup-living-dna-announces-global-family-tree-plans

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 7 months ago by IGRS Editor.
    in reply to: Kenny folk from Counties Tipperary and Galway #9511
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    Have you been in touch with Freda Kenny? She knows a lot about her late husband’s family. Send me an email and I’ll tell you more: steven@masseyandking.com

    in reply to: Neely / Donovan – Thurles Tipperary area #9510
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    I’m not too surprised by you getting DNA matched for Neely in Co Derry as it is a surname found in the northern counties of Ireland.

    Did you check the entries in the original Holycross parish register? If not, you should. They are free at http://registers.nli.ie

    Check for the home townland of the family in the marriage record and the subsequent baptisms. When Margaret married Michael Fogarty, what was her home address?

    Hope this helps

     

    in reply to: HUGH WALSH of Ireland and Yonkers #9509
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    Hello Nancy,

    How clear is the surname Hoag in the NYS death record from 1914? It’s not an Irish surname I recignise. I wonder if it’s an error.

    Have you checked other sources, such as obits, gravestones etc? What about this too:

    https://infowanted.bc.edu/search/

     

    in reply to: BROPHY/COSTELLO Family Members – Laois #9508
     IGRS Editor
    Keymaster

    That’s good advice that Claire gave you PDavis. You should definitely check the original record of the marriage in the parish register. They are free at http://www.nli.ie. Go to the Family History section.

    Also, if there is an address given in the marriage record, follow this up in Griffith’s Primary Valuation, which will date from around the time the family married/migrated.

     

    If thete isn’t an address, look at who the witnesses were to the marriage and then comb through the register for other possibly relevant marriages. It may be possible to get a lead that way.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)

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